One of the possible benefits of a spring cross-country season is the weather. With the final meets of the season taking place in late March due to the pandemic rather than early November as is typical, participants were hoping for a warm sunny day for the Rio Hondo League cross country finals last Thursday afternoon at Pasadena’s Hahamongna Watershed Park.
San Marino head coach Angus Leung might consider a permanent change to the chilly climes as his Titans recorded their best results in a half-decade, finishing second in the girls’ race and third in the boys’ race.
Individually, San Marino senior Peyton Talt finished fourth overall in the girls’ race with a time of 20:12 over the three-mile course. Sophomore Thai Villaluna paced the boys, breaking the tape in 17:45 to end up in ninth place.
Following Talt were junior Anya Tang (21:20, 10th place), senior Avery Page (24:03, 21st), senior Lily Tong (25:30, 25th), sophomore Megan Linden (31:15, 31st) and sophomore Emma Page (31:34, 32nd).
Leung was especially impressed with the performances of Linden and Page, who were making their first appearances in the league finals.
“Megan and Avery volunteered to run for us so we would have enough participants to score in the meet,” said Leung. “I give them a lot of credit.”
Leung also praised Talt, a senior captain, who organized socially distanced, players-only practice sessions to stay in shape during quarantine.

By Maggie Lee
Special to the Tribune

Maggie Lee
President,
Chinese Club of San Marino

Now is the time for San Marino to come together as a community and bring back the goodwill and unity to the city we love so much.
The Chinese Club of San Marino was founded more than 40 years ago as a support system for new immigrants to San Marino. Four decades later, sadly we are still dealing with many of the same issues we had in the past.
As an active member of the San Marino community, CCSM has donated millions of dollars to various organizations within the city through the years. We will continue to play an active role within the community to promote understanding, love and unity in San Marino.
Even with clean streets, manicured lawns and civic traditions, San Marino has not been immune to the global pandemic and the ensuing rise in hate, violence and aggression directed at the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities.
Recent events and world issues have been divisive in nature, and as humans our first instinct is to look for answers often times by placing blame. The community is what makes San Marino special. The Chinese Club of San Marino asks everyone to rededicate themselves to the family values and community spirit to support each other through these times.
This past year has been extremely difficult on our Chinese American communities, and we have felt the weight of the pandemic across every area of our country. As we live through traumatic acts of hate, xenophobic rhetoric and violence, there is an even greater need for our diverse communities to come together to collectively address the challenges that we are facing. COVID-19 has posed issues for all of us. 

More than a year after they abruptly closed due to concerns about COVID-19, San Marino’s public schools can once again be considered “open for business,” effective Thursday, April 1.
“I am very excited for our students,” said school board president Shelley Ryan, herself an educator. “Whether you are in kindergarten, second grade or high school, this is very good news. This has been an exhausting year.”
Students in grades TK — transitional kindergarten — through 5th grade already began in-
person learning at Valentine and Carver elementary schools in late February and early March, but Thursday will mark a significant return to the district’s campuses.

The City Council began its dive into the budgeting session at a special meeting last week, where administrators went over several capital equipment purchases proposed by city departments for the next fiscal year.
No commitments were made last week. Rather, the council signaled a simple agreement that the purchases be included in the departments’ broader budget proposals, potentially with more informative reports on them. Capital projects will be considered in this straw poll format next month.

Grace Navarro

San Marino’s Grace Navarro has advanced to the semifinal round of the Los Angeles Music Center’s annual Spotlight program, thus remaining in contention for more than $100,000 in scholarships.
Navarro, a junior at Los Angeles County High School for the Arts (LACHSA), is majoring in classical voice in the school’s opera company and vocal department. She attended Valentine Elementary and Huntington Middle schools before spending a year at Maranatha, then it was on to LACHSA.
“This is an incredibly unique school and it has given me so many opportunities,” said Navarro. “I love all of my peers, friends and teachers at LACHSA because we are like-minded people and inspire one another to strive for citizen artistry. I really couldn’t ask for a better high school experience. By far, my favorite part about LACHSA is the confidence it instills in me. My teachers always encourage me to believe in what I am doing.”
Navarro also studies piano, music theory and acting. After LACHSA, she plans on taking a gap year before applying to conservatory.

Photos courtesy San Marino National Little League
The Red Angels and Team All Black pose for a joint team photo among the signage welcoming San Marino’s Little Leaguers back to action. Pictured above are (front row, from left) Keegan Vuong, Max Carpiac, Henry Kang, Jake Flores, Jamie Chung, Grant Walker, Emilio Carr, Herman Webb, Grant O’Mara and Jack Rome. Back: Will Martin, Fuming Yang, Dylan Harris, Dylan Lau, Chace Lee, Mason Hsieh, Vincent Hou, Luke Delgado and Nick Grossi.

There is perhaps no more accurate indicator of the societal heath of San Marino than the condition of its Little League. That institution received a spotless check-up at last Saturday morning’s annual Opening Day festivities.
Though teams had been returning to practice sessions for several weeks, players donned uniforms and — in many cases — matching facemasks to celebrate the official return to the season.
“It was great to have our kids back on the fields,” said Daisy Wilson, president of San Marino National Little League, noting that more than 300 kids played their first games on Saturday. “It is so nice to finally be surrounded by some normalcy as we hopefully get back to reality.”
Until further notice, spectators must be from a player’s immediate family, remain socially distanced, and are not allowed to sit in the grandstands.

Robert S. Warren

Robert S. Warren, attorney, philanthropist, community- and professional leader, passed away peacefully, with his family surrounding him, at his home in San Marino on February 13, 2021.
His life exemplified a blending of whole-hearted appreciation of life and the good things in it, with hard work, commitment, integrity, and service to his family, friends, profession, and community.
He was born December 9, 1931, in Pasadena, California, and was raised in South Pasadena, graduating from South Pasadena San Marino High School.

Legal Career

Bob graduated from the University of Southern California in 1953, and USC Law School in 1956. At law school, Bob graduated as salutatorian and with honors, serving as an editor of the USC Law Review. Following graduation, he served as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s Judge Advocate General’s School (“JAG School”) for two years. In 1959, he joined the firm of Gibson, Dunn and Crutcher, where he practiced for 41 years until semi-retirement in 2000. Even after his formal retirement, Bob continued to work as the lead trial lawyer in a massive toxic tort case representing Lockheed Martin Corporation. In his final case as an active attorney, Warren secured an order of dismissal by the trial court following the issuance of an unprecedented set of successful writs by the California Supreme Court in favor of Lockheed.

Cathay Bank has announced a $1 million donation to the Cathay Bank Foundation to support organizations that work to promote diverse communities and combat anti-Asian hate crimes and xenophobia.
Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, the United States. has witnessed the struggle of Asian American and Pacific Islanders against increased violence and harassment fueled by prejudice, hatred and xenophobia. Recent attacks throughout the country reflect a significant increase in anti-Asian hate crimes.
“Racism and xenophobia are antithetical to our values and an affront to what we stand for,” said Chang M. Liu, Cathay Bank president and CEO. “We believe in the equality of all people, treating them with fairness, empathy and acceptance. We condemn this violence against Asian Americans as well as against other ethnic groups and will continue to work and support efforts for greater equality in our business, community and society.”
Dunson Cheng, executive chairman of the board, echoed Liu’s statement and call to action.