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Titanium Robotics

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This past weekend, Titanium Robotics wrapped up its off-season competitions with a bang! The team attended a competition known as Fall Classic in Placentia. Now, the team is focusing on teaching new members important skills as Titanium gears up for the upcoming build season in January. Fall Classic followed the same rules as last year’s game, Destination: Deep Space. Teams were tasked with blocking holes in cargo ships and rocket ships with disks, called hatch panels. Once the holes were blocked, the ships could be loaded with balls, known as cargo. Robots competed throughout the day in alliances of three, with each robot having a certain role. For example, one would play defense against other robots while the other two worked on filling up the cargo ship. At the end of each match, robots were challenged with climbing up platforms to get to their “habitat.” Titanium Robotics finished off the first day of matches as the fourth seed alliance captain and was able to choose which robots to compete with as they entered semifinals. The team was back and better than ever the next day for a new round of matches. That Sunday, Titanium was chosen by the third seed alliance to compete with them against the second seed alliance. Overall, the team did incredibly well, especially compared to their standing at a previous off-season competition, Battleship Blast. New members on the team were able to gain valuable experiences with the robot and with scouting, a way of gathering information…

The entirety of Titanium Robotics’ work effort for the past week has been focused on preparing for their swiftly approaching off-season competition, Fall Classic. Final touches have been implemented so that the team’s robot, Galac[Ti]c, may perform to the best of its design by the competition day. One such final touch included the assembly and attachment of gear boxes for the robot. A gearbox is a container with gears inside held via its casing that are turned by a motor on the robot thus powering other mechanisms. For these to be in optimal condition, it is paramount for the robot to run smoothly and efficiently. Titanium Robotics’ drive team has also been holding several practices to train in operating the robot on the playing field. People in the programming department worked to aid the drive team in the assignment of different tasks the robot can perform by way of the robot’s controllers. With little left to do and Fall Classic almost underway the robotics team’s final main focal points are the working out of logistics for the competition and allowing the drive team as much practice opportunities as possible to provide members with ample time to be immersed into the heavily competitive atmosphere expected from the competition. Fall Classic is taking place on Saturday, September 28 and Sunday, September 29— with matches beginning at nine o’ clock in the morning and ending at five in the evening. The competition is taking place at 500 Bradford Avenue, Placentia, California 92870. Remember,…

Once again, Titanium Robotics is ardently preparing for another off season competition: the Fall Classic. Fall Classic is to take place on Saturday, September 28 and Sunday, September 29. The team is working to improve the robot after analyzing the events of their last competition, Battleship Blast, with the robot’s diagnostics being periodically assessed. These refinements include the upgrade of certain mechanisms on the team’s robot, named Galac[Ti]c. For example, the team is working on the simplification of the robot’s arm, designed to pick up “cargo,” or large balls used as game pieces during competition matches. The hope is that through simplifying Galac[Ti]c’s arm and its movements corresponding to the robot’s controls, point scoring will be easier for Titanium Robotics’ drive team and happen in a more fluent and efficient manner. The material for certain parts of the arm are being reassessed as well. Compliant wheels were deemed by team members to be more efficient than other types of wheels, for it allows the drive team more maneuverability and speed without fear of damaging other parts of the robot, thanks to the flexible nature of the wheels. The robot’s limelight was tested and remounted by a newly manufactured mount. A limelight is a camera designed specifically for robotics competitions. It is a plug-and-play device, which means the camera works with a computer system the moment it is connected, without the need of the users to manually install or change anything. Much of the team’s effort is also being focused toward…

Mentor Kyle Weng, Engineering Vice President Jack Moffat and Business President Madeleine Haddad at Lacy Park July 4. Wednesday, July 3, was the sole day Robotics Summer Camp met during its fifth week. Much of what students did that day was either a continuation of projects from the fourth week of summer camp or a preparation for the next day, July 4. Mechanical engineering and CAD (Computer Aided Design) were some of the fields that resumed work from the previous week. Both fields worked on prototyping and designing models to create a new mechanism. This is to fuse two separate mechanisms that were on last year’s robot, Galac[Ti]c, in order to have a dual-purpose structure. Programming and Electrical engineering, on the other hand, performed jobs preparing for the Fourth of July Parade that was to take place the next day. Throughout the parade, Titanium Robotics took one of its robots, [Ti]rone, that works as a T-shirt cannon, along the parade route to launch souvenirs to the parade’s attendees. In preparation for this event, Electrical engineering worked skillfully and expeditiously to repair the compressor on [Ti]rone. Programming aided in the mending of the team’s T-shirt cannon as well. Programming worked on writing and editing code for the T-shirt cannon to operate. On Thursday, July 4, the parade began at approximately 5 p.m. and lasted around an hour, all the time the Titanium Robotics team shot T-shirts for people to catch, with the hope of creating an additional opportunity for attendees to…

Matthew Lee teaches programming at Titanium Robotics’ summer camp. An open house is slated for Thursday, July 11. Titanium Robotics’ summer camp finished up its fourth week on Wednesday, June 26 and Thursday, June 27. During these two days, students from several departments began brainstorming and discussing new designs for the mechanism that was reviewed by mentors the week before. During the competition, teams’ robots must carry out two tasks. The goal for our team is to make a single mechanism that can perform both of these tasks in a simple and easy way. After creating an original design, and that design being diligently picked apart and scrutinized by mentors, it was time for students to make new models. CAD (Computer Aided Design) members began creating the design plans for new ideas each participant came up with. Mechanical engineering trainees collaborated with CAD learners to begin discussing the logistics regarding new prototype plans. Mechanical engineering members built a new prototype working similarly to the original but with some revisions. Programming continued teaching newcomers how to program as electrical engineering started finalizing their projects and testing their work on the robot. Observing the work taking place throughout the fourth week of summer camp, Yuxiang Zhang commented, “I’m really happy with how well everyone’s doing and I think with summer camp ending soon we’ve made a lot of great progress.” With only two weeks of summer camp to go students are working fervently to complete jobs and designs. On Thursday, July 11,…

Titanium Robotics held another week of its popular summer camp. The third week of sessions was extremely busy for members in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, programming and CAD alike. Every member of every field was engaged and immersed in new tasks and jobs. Starting on Wednesday, June 19, CAD (computer aided design) and mechanical engineering began building prototypes to exemplify the framework for the new mechanism the team wishes to incorporate into the robot for the next competition. Newcomers in mechanical engineering split into two groups, each building their own model of the same mechanism in order for every member to get familiar with how the mechanism would work and the logistics of building it. CAD members split into two groups as well, and alternated between working in CAD and mechanical engineering. This was done in order to allow members of CAD to become accustomed to the mechanism and how it is built in order to create the drawings in the best way. Electrical engineering moved on from the electrical board to pneumatics on last year’s practice robot and programming continued their introductory lessons. The third week of Titanium Robotics’ summer camp finished up on Thursday, June 20, with a mentor review. Five mentors—one a teacher at San Marino High School and the other four alumni of the team—heard presentations from the incoming team members about the specifics of how the mechanism is designed to work during the actual competition. Mentors asked several questions and gave helpful feedback and insight…

SUMMER FUN: Left to right, Kyle Ly, Rylan Suetsugu, and Marcus Koh learn CAD at Titanium Robotics summer camp. Titanium Robotics hosted the second week of its renowned summer camp on Wednesday June 12 and Thursday June 13. This week was focused on allowing newcomers the opportunity to begin to work more independently and propose their own ideas. The first day, incoming team members working in mechanical engineering had a competition in which each person designed and made their own small cars to be raced down a ramp. Participants were allowed to design their cars however they wished, as long as it fit onto the ramp, and were able to use whatever materials they felt would be the most speed efficient to build their car’s parts out of. Once they were finished, mechanical’s newcomers raced their cars down a track and were timed. This year’s winner set a new record for the fastest time. During the second day of summer camp this week, CAD (computer aided design) and mechanical engineering got to work to start the design process to modify last year’s competition robot, Galac[Ti]c, to prepare it for the team’s next competition. Newcomers, with the guidance of returning team members, solidified a design plan for CAD to begin “CAD-ing” the mechanism and for the mechanical field to start building prototypes. The goal of the new mechanism is to be able to perform the tasks of two different mechanisms that were originally separate on Galac[Ti]c. Throughout the duration of both…

Titanium Robotics Business President Madeleine Haddad, far right, explains to newcomers how to use photoshop. On Wednesday June 5, San Marino High School’s Titanium Robotics team kicked off its annual summer camp. The camp lasted from 1-4 p.m. and took place again the next day at the same time. Enthusiastic camp attendees got a taste of all of the fields in robotics and chose the field—or fields—they were most interested in to work on for the remainder of summer camp. Students worked on a series of projects and activities with the goal of learning the basics of each field- electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, programming, graphic design, and CAD (Computer Aided Design) on the first day. By the second day of summer camp, students delved deeper into their chosen fields and began larger, more complicated projects. During the first day of summer camp, participants went through a series of rotations exhibiting and highlighting a certain field of robotics. At each rotation, students had the opportunity to be exposed to the type of work that field does. After safety training, students applied their newfound knowledge to begin assembling their own basic metal structures. Electrical engineering began to teach new students foundational concepts regarding wiring and circuitry. Programming looked at different segments of code with the newcomers and displayed which section of code controlled which functions on the robot. CAD began to teach students the fundamentals of computer aided design and gave a general overview while graphic design, representing business in its entirety…

MARCHING 4th: San Marino High School’s Titanium Robotics team circles Lacy Park as part of the Rotary Club of San Marino’s annual 4th of July Parade last year, one of the many benefits of Robotics Summer Camp, which is taking newcomers. On Wednesday, June 5, Titanium Robotics kicks off its free summer camp for interested students to get a taste of and learn about the team’s different fields before school starts. Occurring during the six weeks that summer school is also being held (June 5 through July 11), Titanium’s summer camp will take place every Wednesday and Thursday from 1-4:00 p.m. All incoming ninth through twelfth graders are welcome and no experience or prior knowledge is required. Anyone can sign up on the team’s website (www.titaniumrobotics.com/summer) and each meeting will take place at San Marino High School in room 308. At the summer camp, new team members will get the chance to experience each field of robotics: Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer-Aided Design, Programming, Strategy, Business, and Design. In Mechanical Engineering, students will receive training on how to handle several tools to get a head start on learning the processes of constructing different parts of the team’s robots. Electrical Engineering also focuses on the physical aspects of the robot, but prioritizes the robot’s wiring and power sources. Computer-Aided Design is based on making computer-generated “blueprints” for the robot and all of its parts. In Programming, students will be introduced to Java, a programming language, and the WPI Library, a set…

FINAL FUN: Stella Yao, Elise Hong, Dina Weiss and Lizzy Castreje enjoy Titanium Robotics’ end-of-year banquet, which was held last Saturday evening. Gaby Yonarta Photo Titanium Robotics finished up a fantastic 2018-19 year with its annual banquet last Saturday evening, where around forty people, consisting of Titanium Robotics team members, their family members, San Marino High School and Titanium Robotics alumni, and the team’s mentors, enjoyed an evening of fun and fond memories. Sophomore Julian Sze enjoyed “having fun with other team members,” concluding the event to have been “in general really, really fun.” At the banquet the guests heard several speeches from mentors, former Engineering President Olivia Cameron, previous Business President Kimia Hassibi, new Engineering President Edmond Wen, and new Business President Madeleine Haddad. During these speeches, Titanium Robotics’ departing seniors were recognized and given gifts of farewell: intricately detailed models of this year’s competition robot. Ben Ung, Olivia Cameron, Stella Yao, Dina Weiss, Max Winn, Elizabeth Castreje, and William Cockrum were all recognized, bid farewell, and wished best of luck after retiring as team members—hopefully to return as future mentors. Accompanying senior recognition, awards were bestowed upon several team members by the newly appointed engineering and business presidents. These awards were voted upon by all current members of Titanium Robotics; the categories being, most valuable nerd, most inspirational, rookie of the year, most spirited, most graciously professional, and the safety award. These titles were granted to Matthew Lee, Jack Moffat, Amanda Lopez, Taylor Suetsugu, Ben Ung, and Sophia…