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Grace Navarro San Marino’s Grace Navarro has advanced to the semifinal round of the Los Angeles Music Center’s annual Spotlight program, thus remaining in contention for more than $100,000 in scholarships.Navarro, a junior at Los Angeles County High School for the Arts (LACHSA), is majoring in classical voice in the school’s opera company and vocal department. She attended Valentine Elementary and Huntington Middle schools before spending a year at Maranatha, then it was on to LACHSA.“This is an incredibly unique school and it has given me so many opportunities,” said Navarro. “I love all of my peers, friends and teachers at LACHSA because we are like-minded people and inspire one another to strive for citizen artistry. I really couldn’t ask for a better high school experience. By far, my favorite part about LACHSA is the confidence it instills in me. My teachers always encourage me to believe in what I am doing.”Navarro also studies piano, music theory and acting. After LACHSA, she plans on taking a gap year before applying to conservatory.

Photos courtesy San Marino National Little LeagueThe Red Angels and Team All Black pose for a joint team photo among the signage welcoming San Marino’s Little Leaguers back to action. Pictured above are (front row, from left) Keegan Vuong, Max Carpiac, Henry Kang, Jake Flores, Jamie Chung, Grant Walker, Emilio Carr, Herman Webb, Grant O’Mara and Jack Rome. Back: Will Martin, Fuming Yang, Dylan Harris, Dylan Lau, Chace Lee, Mason Hsieh, Vincent Hou, Luke Delgado and Nick Grossi. There is perhaps no more accurate indicator of the societal heath of San Marino than the condition of its Little League. That institution received a spotless check-up at last Saturday morning’s annual Opening Day festivities.Though teams had been returning to practice sessions for several weeks, players donned uniforms and — in many cases — matching facemasks to celebrate the official return to the season.“It was great to have our kids back on the fields,” said Daisy Wilson, president of San Marino National Little League, noting that more than 300 kids played their first games on Saturday. “It is so nice to finally be surrounded by some normalcy as we hopefully get back to reality.”Until further notice, spectators must be from a player’s immediate family, remain socially distanced, and are not allowed to sit in the grandstands.

Robert S. Warren, attorney, philanthropist, community- and professional leader, passed away peacefully, with his family surrounding him, at his home in San Marino on February 13, 2021. His life exemplified a blending of whole-hearted appreciation of life and the good things in it, with hard work, commitment, integrity, and service to his family, friends, profession, and community. He was born December 9, 1931, in Pasadena, California, and was raised in South Pasadena, graduating from South Pasadena San Marino High School. Legal Career Bob graduated from the University of Southern California in 1953, and USC Law School in 1956. At law school, Bob graduated as salutatorian and with honors, serving as an editor of the USC Law Review. Following graduation, he served as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s Judge Advocate General’s School (“JAG School”) for two years. In 1959, he joined the firm of Gibson, Dunn and Crutcher, where he practiced for 41 years until semi-retirement in 2000. Even after his formal retirement, Bob continued to work as the lead trial lawyer in a massive toxic tort case representing Lockheed Martin Corporation. In his final case as an active attorney, Warren secured an order of dismissal by the trial court following the issuance of an unprecedented set of successful writs by the California Supreme Court in favor of Lockheed.

Cathay Bank has announced a $1 million donation to the Cathay Bank Foundation to support organizations that work to promote diverse communities and combat anti-Asian hate crimes and xenophobia.Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, the United States. has witnessed the struggle of Asian American and Pacific Islanders against increased violence and harassment fueled by prejudice, hatred and xenophobia. Recent attacks throughout the country reflect a significant increase in anti-Asian hate crimes.“Racism and xenophobia are antithetical to our values and an affront to what we stand for,” said Chang M. Liu, Cathay Bank president and CEO. “We believe in the equality of all people, treating them with fairness, empathy and acceptance. We condemn this violence against Asian Americans as well as against other ethnic groups and will continue to work and support efforts for greater equality in our business, community and society.”Dunson Cheng, executive chairman of the board, echoed Liu’s statement and call to action.

Dr. Lori MorganHuntington Hospital CEO Huntington Hospital attained Magnet recognition again in March, a testament to its continued dedication to high-quality nursing practice. The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet Recognition Program distinguishes health care organizations that meet rigorous standards for nursing excellence. This credential is the highest national honor for professional nursing practice.Receiving Magnet recognition for the third time is an achievement for Huntington Hospital, as it continues to belong to the global Magnet community — a small, select group of domestic health care organizations and hospitals in the U.S.“Magnet recognition is a tremendous honor and reflects our commitment to delivering the highest quality of care to this community,” said Dr. Lori J. Morgan, Huntington Hospital’s president and CEO. “To earn Magnet recognition once was a great accomplishment and an incredible source of pride for our nurses. Our repeated achievement of this credential underscores the foundation of excellence and values that drive our entire staff to strive harder each day to meet the health care needs of the people we serve.”

Photo courtesy MHSCDan AusmanPresident and CEO, Methodist Hospital Photo courtesy Ricardo Carasco IIIRodney HannersInterim CEO,Keck Medicine of USC Officials with Keck Medicine of USC and Methodist Hospital of Southern California have announced that the organizations are exploring an affiliation to expand access to care and enhance the health of residents in the San Gabriel Valley, according to a statement. The affiliation would bring Methodist Hospital into the Keck Medicine clinical enterprise, creating new opportunities for service growth and investment in the Arcadia community and across the region.“Methodist Hospital has a longstanding history of providing excellent care in the San Gabriel Valley and has the potential to be a strong partner as we work together to expand services and create easier access to primary and complex care for the people we serve,” said Rodney Hanners, interim CEO for Keck Medicine of USC. “This affiliation would not only complement our current satellite in Arcadia, but also provide opportunities to elevate our entire network that we are excited to explore further.”

The City Council delayed judgment of an appeal to a future date, in part to push the applicants to actually get input from a number of neighbors regarding a reality television series the applicants hope to film at a home. In its meeting last week, the council also punted on an appeal for a mixed-use building proposed to be built along Mission Street, instead opting to schedule a de novo hearing at a later date. The city is expected to argue that the project should be denied because it could not pass a plan check in the event it was approved, at least as currently designed. The four applicants for the denied filming permit — Rosemary Lay, Julie Chan Lin, Alice Shyu and Weni Wilson — are in the meantime tasked with revisiting a number of homes within a 500-foot radius of their own houses they deemed to be unoccupied in their initial surveys. Additionally, the city staff report indicated that they overlooked some required homes entirely in their initial surveying.

Less than two weeks after the defeat of Measure E, the San Marino school board unanimously approved a resolution calling for the elimination of 41 teaching and advisory positions in order to balance the budget for the 2021-22 school year, it was announced at Tuesday night’s board meeting. Though the results of the election have not yet been certified, Measure E had been approved by 2,192 voters (63.04%) to 1,285 (36.96%) who voted in opposition. Measure E required a two-thirds majority for passage. Measure E raised $4 million annually at $968 per parcel, adjusted by the lesser of the Los Angeles Statistical Area Consumer Price Index or 3%, including commercial properties within the boundaries of the school district. First approved by voters in 2009 for a six-year term, the parcel tax was renewed in 2015 and will now expire in June 2021, erasing approximately 10% of the district’s budget.

The Rev. Jenifer Chatfield was filled with anticipation. After going through a six-month interview process that began in the early fall of 2019, Chatfield was officially called to serve as the eighth rector of San Marino’s St. Edmunds Episcopal Church. Chatfield, who was introduced to the parish in January 2020, presided over her first service on March 1, 2020, which coincided with the first Sunday of Lent. “I had a great time,” said Chatfield, laughing, and with full understanding of what was coming next. “The following Sunday, there was no communion wine, no hugs. No shaking of hands. Then of course, we know what happened.” Just as the COVID-19 pandemic has yet to run its course, Chatfield didn’t quite finish that sentence. She has, however, gone about the business of forging relationships with her parishioners in what is among the most difficult ministerial environment, especially for a newcomer.