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June 21, 1929 – March 18, 2021

Virginia Madeleine de Surville Muller

Virginia (Ginny) Madeleine de Surville Muller was called home to our Lord, and the angels on Thursday morning, March 18, 2021. She passed in her sleep with her loving husband, George, by her side.
Born June 21, 1929, to Emile and Helen (Sutherland) de Surville in San Francisco, California, Ginny, to all who knew her, was the kindest and most caring of individuals. She touched the lives all that knew her.
Ginny and George were married in 1954 after meeting on a double date by their mutual friend, Max Love. What a prophetic “date” that was! During their 67 years of marriage, they raised three daughters: Victoria, Robin and Mary. Ginny was totally dedicated to her children and to her husband in all aspects of their lives.
She was a graduate of Westridge School for Girls in Pasadena, California and Mount Vernon College in Washington, DC. She spent all of her married life in Pasadena and Santa Barbara. She was active in the Pasadena Junior League, Pasadena Guild of Children’s Hospital and Villa Esperanza. Ginny could always be found working at a polling place during many presidential elections, and she spent many years working for Port O’ Call in the antiques department.

By Maggie Lee
Special to the Tribune

Maggie Lee
President,
Chinese Club of San Marino

Now is the time for San Marino to come together as a community and bring back the goodwill and unity to the city we love so much.
The Chinese Club of San Marino was founded more than 40 years ago as a support system for new immigrants to San Marino. Four decades later, sadly we are still dealing with many of the same issues we had in the past.
As an active member of the San Marino community, CCSM has donated millions of dollars to various organizations within the city through the years. We will continue to play an active role within the community to promote understanding, love and unity in San Marino.
Even with clean streets, manicured lawns and civic traditions, San Marino has not been immune to the global pandemic and the ensuing rise in hate, violence and aggression directed at the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities.
Recent events and world issues have been divisive in nature, and as humans our first instinct is to look for answers often times by placing blame. The community is what makes San Marino special. The Chinese Club of San Marino asks everyone to rededicate themselves to the family values and community spirit to support each other through these times.
This past year has been extremely difficult on our Chinese American communities, and we have felt the weight of the pandemic across every area of our country. As we live through traumatic acts of hate, xenophobic rhetoric and violence, there is an even greater need for our diverse communities to come together to collectively address the challenges that we are facing. COVID-19 has posed issues for all of us. 

Robert S. Warren

Robert S. Warren, attorney, philanthropist, community- and professional leader, passed away peacefully, with his family surrounding him, at his home in San Marino on February 13, 2021.
His life exemplified a blending of whole-hearted appreciation of life and the good things in it, with hard work, commitment, integrity, and service to his family, friends, profession, and community.
He was born December 9, 1931, in Pasadena, California, and was raised in South Pasadena, graduating from South Pasadena San Marino High School.

Legal Career

Bob graduated from the University of Southern California in 1953, and USC Law School in 1956. At law school, Bob graduated as salutatorian and with honors, serving as an editor of the USC Law Review. Following graduation, he served as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s Judge Advocate General’s School (“JAG School”) for two years. In 1959, he joined the firm of Gibson, Dunn and Crutcher, where he practiced for 41 years until semi-retirement in 2000. Even after his formal retirement, Bob continued to work as the lead trial lawyer in a massive toxic tort case representing Lockheed Martin Corporation. In his final case as an active attorney, Warren secured an order of dismissal by the trial court following the issuance of an unprecedented set of successful writs by the California Supreme Court in favor of Lockheed.

Cathay Bank has announced a $1 million donation to the Cathay Bank Foundation to support organizations that work to promote diverse communities and combat anti-Asian hate crimes and xenophobia.
Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, the United States. has witnessed the struggle of Asian American and Pacific Islanders against increased violence and harassment fueled by prejudice, hatred and xenophobia. Recent attacks throughout the country reflect a significant increase in anti-Asian hate crimes.
“Racism and xenophobia are antithetical to our values and an affront to what we stand for,” said Chang M. Liu, Cathay Bank president and CEO. “We believe in the equality of all people, treating them with fairness, empathy and acceptance. We condemn this violence against Asian Americans as well as against other ethnic groups and will continue to work and support efforts for greater equality in our business, community and society.”
Dunson Cheng, executive chairman of the board, echoed Liu’s statement and call to action.

Dr. Lori Morgan
Huntington Hospital CEO

Huntington Hospital attained Magnet recognition again in March, a testament to its continued dedication to high-quality nursing practice. The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet Recognition Program distinguishes health care organizations that meet rigorous standards for nursing excellence. This credential is the highest national honor for professional nursing practice.
Receiving Magnet recognition for the third time is an achievement for Huntington Hospital, as it continues to belong to the global Magnet community — a small, select group of domestic health care organizations and hospitals in the U.S.
“Magnet recognition is a tremendous honor and reflects our commitment to delivering the highest quality of care to this community,” said Dr. Lori J. Morgan, Huntington Hospital’s president and CEO. “To earn Magnet recognition once was a great accomplishment and an incredible source of pride for our nurses. Our repeated achievement of this credential underscores the foundation of excellence and values that drive our entire staff to strive harder each day to meet the health care needs of the people we serve.”

Photo courtesy MHSC
Dan Ausman
President and CEO,
Methodist Hospital
Photo courtesy Ricardo Carasco III
Rodney Hanners
Interim CEO,
Keck Medicine of USC

Officials with Keck Medicine of USC and Methodist Hospital of Southern California have announced that the organizations are exploring an affiliation to expand access to care and enhance the health of residents in the San Gabriel Valley, according to a statement. The affiliation would bring Methodist Hospital into the Keck Medicine clinical enterprise, creating new opportunities for service growth and investment in the Arcadia community and across the region.
“Methodist Hospital has a longstanding history of providing excellent care in the San Gabriel Valley and has the potential to be a strong partner as we work together to expand services and create easier access to primary and complex care for the people we serve,” said Rodney Hanners, interim CEO for Keck Medicine of USC. “This affiliation would not only complement our current satellite in Arcadia, but also provide opportunities to elevate our entire network that we are excited to explore further.”

By Congresswoman Judy Chu
Special to the Tribune

Congresswoman Judy Chu

Matthew Leung was sitting at a Rosemead bus stop when a man grabbed his cane and beat his hand and head, causing Leung to lose the tip of one of his fingers. This horrific attack should be unthinkable. Instead, it is just one of a recent spike in anti-Asian hate crimes and incidents happening all across the nation.
What worries so many is that many of the recent victims have been older and more vulnerable. In San Francisco, Vicha Ratanapakdee, an 84-year-old Thai man, was killed in an unprovoked assault while on his morning walk. In New York, a 61-year-old Filipino man’s face was slashed from ear to ear with a box cutter in the subway. In Oakland’s Chinatown, a camera captured a 91-year-old man being thrown to the ground by an assailant, who then went to assault two more victims. This is becoming almost a daily tragedy.
It was a year ago, at the start of the coronavirus pandemic, long before stay-at-home orders were put in place, that Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) were already starting to feel the sting of prejudice due to misinformation and stigma that wrongly associated AAPIs with the coronavirus.

As dedicated volunteers, working intimately at each of our San Marino School sites, we are devastated at the failure of Measure E. Despite PTA and community efforts to support the Measure E campaign, it failed to pass by 120 votes. On March 9, the School Board voted to eliminate 41.2 positions throughout San Marino Schools. We are heartbroken for our students, teachers and staff.

Barbara Franks Bice

Longtime local resident Barbara Franks Bice has been appointed to the board of directors at Muse/ique, a Pasadena-based pioneering live music organization which holds a summer events series at The Huntington.
The board, chaired by philanthropist LeeAnn Havner, provides leadership in carrying out Muse/ique’s mission of making music accessible to all through adventurous and meaningful programming, an effort continued throughout the pandemic with drive-in concerts, lawn serenades, and “In a Minute! (…or Two!)” video series, which recently surpassed 100 episodes.
Also joining the board are Christine Swanson and Jonathan Weedman.
“To serve as chair of Muse/ique’s board of directors is to be part of an inspiring and passionate team,” said Havner. “With much enthusiasm, we welcome to the board our newest members — Barbara Franks Bice, Chirstine Swanson and Jonathan Weedman — all of whom bring a breadth of experience and expertise that will help bring to fruition Muse/ique’s adventurous plans for the future.”

Photo courtesy Project Edge
Project Edge co-founders include Randy Cai (from left), Kevin Lan, Marcus Chua, Corey Sy, and Dowson Yang.

Doing their part in reducing a “gap” in educational needs that has arisen during COVID-19, several San Marino High School students recently started Project Edge — a cost-free tutoring service available to anyone with a computer and internet access.
It’s no secret that the COVID-19 pandemic has only widened a discrepancy in education results between those who can easily keep up and those who cannot. Students now have to adapt to an online schooling environment that is not universally effective and, thus, are unable to receive a proper education at this time. Students everywhere have been turning to tutoring as a solution, although there are problems in that domain as well.